2015 IB presentation

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by Angela DeHartUsing the Design CycleTo CreateInterdisciplinaryProject-basedSTEM Simulations

What if the home economics, math and science departments used the design cycle to reinforce the STEM concepts embedded in their subject matter?DesignCycleScientific MethodEngineering CycleIdentify the problemAsk a questionIdentify the problem

X

Classroom PracticesAssessmentLife Skills

Would teachers be better able to:

Create more experiences and opportunities in the classroom that allow students to be genuine inquirers?

X

Classroom PracticesAssessmentLife Skills

Would teachers be better able to:

Empower students to take responsibility of their own learning?

X

Would teachers be better able to:

Do formative assessments provide students with enough opportunities to take intellectual risks, and yet still feel supported the classroom setting?

Classroom PracticesAssessmentLife Skills

I believe the answer to that question is Yes.

Home Economics (FACS)

A CTE Course(Career Technical Education)

Home Economics (FACS)

A CTE Course(Career Technical Education)

Home Economics (FACS)

A CTE Course(Career Technical Education)Life SkillsCuttingSewingCleaningTechnologyCookingMeasurementBudgetingShoppingCraftingGeometryBuilder=

Home Economics =

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Life SkillsCuttingSewingCleaningTechnologyCookingMeasurementBudgetingShoppingCraftingGeometryBuilderLife SkillsClothing DesignerSurgeonPeace CorpProgrammerChefSurveyorCFOMarketingAdafruitArchitectEngineer

Home Economics +

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Life SkillsBudget-How to write a check

Ratios-How to figure out the tip -Counting change backMath

Home Economics +

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Life SkillsCooking-Chemistry-Biology-Reporting/recording results

Science

Home Economics +

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Life SkillsMeasurement-Volume-Distance-Equations

Nutrition-Health-Economics-Community Service

Science Math &

Chapter1TheHistoryofHomeEconomicsDesignCycleScientific MethodEngineering CycleInvestigateResearchResearch

Home Economics related Problemsin the late 1800s early 1900sSolutions*identifying of the connection between infectious disease and human wasteProblems*smell of living near cesspits and primitive outhouses*spread of deadly infectious diseasessuch as typhoid fever, cholera,malaria, and polio*the invention & construction of city-wide sewer system*the invention of indoor plumbing*reduced life expectancy*significant reduction of overall death rate*poor nutrition*better nutrition*poor child care*child care*inadequate hygiene*clean drinking water*clean water*better hygiene practices

Ellen H. Swallow RichardsThe most prominent femaleAmerican chemist of the19th century, Ellen H.Swallow Richards (18421911) was a pioneer in sanitary engineering and a founder of home economics in the United States.She was first to suggestthat public water be treated with chlorine.http://www.chemheritage.org/discover/online-resources/chemistry-in-history/themes/public-and-environmental-health/public-health-and-safety/richards-e.aspx

Ellen H. Swallow RichardsAt Vassar she was attracted to astronomy and chemistry. Upon graduation she applied for positions with various industrial chemists, but was turned down in all cases. At the suggestion of one of these chemists, however, she applied and was accepted as a special student at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology,making her the first woman in America to be accepted by a scientific school. Three years later she received a second bachelors degreea B.S. from MIT as well as a masters degree from Vassar, to which she had submitted a thesis on the chemical analysis of an iron ore. She then continued at MIT with hopes of earning a doctorate, but MIT was not to award its firstdoctorate to a woman until 1886.http://www.chemheritage.org/discover/online-resources/chemistry-in-history/themes/public-and-environmental-health/public-health-and-safety/richards-e.aspx

Ellen H. Swallow RichardsIn 1875 she married Robert Hallowell Richards, chairman of the MITs mining engineering department. Supported in her ambitions by her husband, Richards volunteered her services as well as$1,000 annually to further womens scientific education at MIT. Through her efforts, the Womens Laboratory was established in 1876, and in 1879 she was recognized as an assistant instructor, without pay, for teaching the curriculum in chemical analysis, industrial chemistry, mineralogy, and applied biology. The laboratory was closed in1883 after MIT began awarding undergraduate degrees to women on a regular basis and there was no more need for a special trackhttp://www.chemheritage.org/discover/online-resources/chemistry-in-history/themes/public-and-environmental-health/public-health-and-safety/richards-e.aspx

Ellen H. Swallow RichardsIn 1884 Mrs. Richards was appointed instructor in Sanitary Chemistry at the Institute of Technology, a position which she held [until] her death. For many years she directed the entire instruction in the chemistry of air, water and foods, for chemists, biologists and sanitary engineers.She also maintained an extensive privatepractice in sanitary chemistry for many years and acted in an advisory capacity for a very large number of public and private institutions. Her publications relating to sanitation [were] numerous and varied,and she maintained active membership in, and participated in the meetings of local and national societies dealing with water supplies and public health problems.http://libraries.mit.edu/archives/exhibits/esr/esr-biography.html

Ellen H. Swallow RichardsBeginning in 1899, Richards, along with Melvil Dewey and other educators and activists, organized a series of annual gatherings that became known as the Lake Placid Conferences, because the first of these, and several of the later ones, was held at Lake Placid, New York. Out of these conferences, a movement took shape that slowly defined itself and began pursuingspecific goals. At the first conference,participants agreed on the term "home economics," which was held to be sufficiently broad to cover a wide range of concerns, and theybegan energetic and successful efforts to promote the teaching of home economics in secondary schools andin colleges and universities.http://hearth.library.cornell.edu/h/hearth/about.html

HomeOffered women*entry into higherEconomicseducation (excluded prior to 1848)*job previously reserved for men*gained managerial positions (i.e. college professor)*became speakers for womens issues (Womens rights, 19th Amendment)*held government positions

http://hearth.library.cornell.edu/http://libraries.mit.edu/archives/exhibits/esr/esr-womenslab.html

Chapter2OpportunitiesforFACSTodayDesign CycleScientificMethodEngineering CycleDesign/plan a product/solutionConstruct a hypothesisDevelop possible solutions

Sally Kristen Ride wasan American physicistand astronaut. Ridejoined NASA in 1978and became the firstAmerican woman inspaceDanica McKellerMathematician &ActressHonored by BritishJournal of PhysicsSummer Camp SparksTeenage Girls Interestin STEM Careerswww.utdallas.eduMayim BialikPhD in NeuroscienceAuthor & ActressArticle about Blackwomen in STEM(see bibliography)Article about Womenin Nontraditional Roles(see bibiography)

Home Economics related Problems in Todays SocietyProblems*spread of deadly infectious diseases..In 2013 only 2 of the 8 laboratory-confirmed bacterialsuch as norovirus, salmonella,staphylococcus, E.coli 0156:H7, and listeriainfections in the US decreased. The rest remained ator above their previous level*reduced life expectancy due to poorIn 2012 Japan, France, Switzerland and Sweden allnutrition and lack of exerciselonger life expectancy rate than Americans (+3)*Type 2 diabetes, especially in childrenin 2012 cost the healthcare system 245 billion*obesity..if current trajectories continue by 2030 13 statescould have obesity rates above 60%*nonfatal injuries to children under 5 isuse of cell phones has parents distractedon the rise*clean water....the lack of toilets is a challenge in India

Home Economics related Problems in todays societyProblemsFACS CourseCurriculum*spread of deadly infectious diseasesLife Planningsuch as norovirus, salmonella,Culinary Arts 1, 2staphylococcus, E.coli H-0157, and Fitness & Foodlisteria*reduced life expectancy due to poor.Life Planningnutrition and lack of exercise*obesity.Fitness & Foods.................FACS 6th ,7th8th,grades*Type 2 diabetes, especially in children.Child Development and Parenting*nonfatal injuries to children under 5 is.Early Childhood Careers 1, 2on the rise*clean water...Cooking classes (importance of Safety and Sanitation) FCCLA (history of home economics)

Home Economicsrelated ProblemsProblems in 1800s*spread of deadly infectious diseases such as typhoid fever, cholera,Todays Problems*spread of deadly infectious diseases such as norovirus, salmonella, staphylococcus, E.coli H-0157, and listeriamalaria, and polio*reduced life expectancy due to poornutrition, inadequate hygiene and unsanitary living conditions*reduced life expectancy due to poornutrition and lack of exercise; obesity; Type 2 diabetes*poor child care*nonfatal injuries to children under5 is on the rise*clean water in cities*clean water in developing nations

"plus a change, plus c'est la mme chose""the more things change, the more they stay the same"-Jean Baptiste Alphonse Karr.Insanity: doing the same thing overover again and expecting differentresults.and-Albe