ENGLISH C1

download ENGLISH C1

of 30

  • date post

    02-Jan-2017
  • Category

    Documents

  • view

    245
  • download

    0

Embed Size (px)

Transcript of ENGLISH C1

  • EVALUACIN Y CERTIFICACIN DEL CONOCIMIENTO DE IDIOMAS AVALUACI I CERTIFICACI DEL CONEIXEMENT DIDIOMES

    Pruebas de Acreditacin del Conocimiento de

    Lenguas Extranjeras

    Proves dAcreditaci del Coneixement de Llenges

    Estrangeres

    PRUEBAS DE ACREDITACIN DEL CONOCIMIENTO DE LENGUAS EXTRANJERAS

    PROVES DACREDITACI DEL CONEIXEMENT DE LLENGES ESTRANGERES

    MODELO DE EXAMEN. INGLS C1 -Parte 1. Comprensin lectora -Parte 2. Comprensin auditiva -Parte 3. Expresin e interaccin escritas

    -Parte 4. Expresin e interaccin orales. Materiales para los candidatos (A y B)

    ENGLISH

    C1

  • CENTRE DIDIOMES DE LA UNIVERSITAT DE VALNCIA 2

    EVALUACIN Y CERTIFICACIN DEL CONOCIMIENTO DE IDIOMAS AVALUACI I CERTIFICACI DEL CONEIXEMENT DIDIOMES

    PRUEBAS DE ACREDITACIN DEL CONOCIMIENTO DE LENGUAS EXTRANJERAS

    PROVES DACREDITACI DEL CONEIXEMENT DE LLENGES ESTRANGERES

    PART 1: READING COMPREHENSION

    TIME : 70 minutes

    ENGLISH

    C1

    Pruebas de Acreditacin del Conocimiento de

    Lenguas Extranjeras

    Proves dAcreditaci del Coneixement de Llenges

    Estrangeres

    Lloc i data dexamen

  • CENTRE DIDIOMES DE LA UNIVERSITAT DE VALNCIA 3

    Draft

  • CENTRE DIDIOMES DE LA UNIVERSITAT DE VALNCIA 4

    Instructions

    -In this booklet you will find three texts, their set tasks and examples for each one. Read

    all of them carefully and complete the tasks as required.

    -Incorrect answers are not deducted from the final mark for the assessment of this part

    of the exam.

    You have 70 minutes to complete this part of the exam. All exam materials will then be

    collected and additional time is not permitted. Please manage your time well.

    -You may use this booklet to make notes. However, it should be noted that any answers

    will not be assessed under any circumstances.

    -Write your answers on Answer Sheet 1 (Task1).

  • CENTRE DIDIOMES DE LA UNIVERSITAT DE VALNCIA 5

    Task 1 Instructions

    Read the following interview from which the questions have been removed.

    Read the 7 questions on the next page (A-K). Match them with their corresponding gap (1-10).

    There is one extra question you do not need to use.

    Write your answers on Answer Sheet 1 (Task 1).

    An Interview With Liam OFlynn, Irish Piper From County Kildare, Ireland, master uilleann piper Liam O'Flynn was born into a musical family -- his father was a schoolmaster and fiddle player and his mother, who played and taught piano, came from a family of famous musicians from Clare. 0__________________A_______________________________ That's right, and also because of the fact that you have two octaves. The old pipers used to say that it takes twenty-one years to make a piper: seven years of learning, seven years of practicing and seven years of playing. I think there's a lot of truth to that because it's a complex instrument and requires a lot of co-ordination to play a tune. You're learning all the time. 1_________________________________________________ I spent six years with a practice set which consisted of the bellows, the bag and the chanter. My teacher insisted that I spend that length of time with the chanter, because the essence of the music comes from that part of the instrument. Then I was given a half set of drones for two years before getting the full set. 2 _________________________________________________ It's great when someone comes up to you after seeing the uilleann pipes played for the first time. They can be utterly amazed by all the things going on. You're pumping bellows, keeping pressure on your left arm, sending air into the instrument, and they also see something happening under the right wrist, where the regulators are. There's a lot going on. 3 _________________________________________________ Traditional Irish music, as we know it, evolved through the 17th Century to the 19th Century. There are particular sorts of tunes that fit the pipes really well. These are tunes that have been composed by pipers, or which have been taken and played into shape for the pipes. There are certain piping techniques which are part of the way the instrument speaks, and pipers will go for tunes into which these techniques can be worked. There exists a body of tunes that has evolved over the years, into beautifully rounded, perfect piping tunes. 4 _________________________________________________ The singing style would be older, but there's a parallel development and evolution going on. If I have a new slow air tune, I make an effort to find a traditional sean nos singer to sing it, because it then translates much better back on to the instrument. 5 _________________________________________________ In the Irish tradition, double jigs, written in 6/8 time, are the oldest form. Then there are reels, hornpipes, single jigs and slip jigs, and slow airs which come from sean nos. This old style of song tune is an art form in itself. There's also a body of march tunes. A lot of the jig tunes were originally clan marches. 6_________________________________________________ The Clare tradition had a strong influence on my development, and when I go to County Clare, there's such a strong tradition of dancing there. The Clare-set is a great thing, so there's a terrific satisfaction in playing for a set.

    x-apple-data-detectors://4/

  • CENTRE DIDIOMES DE LA UNIVERSITAT DE VALNCIA 6

    7_________________________________________________ I was born into a traditional musical family. My father played the fiddle and he had a good friend who was an uilleann piper. I was very fortunate to have Leo Rowsome as my first teacher, not just because he was a good piper and teacher, but also because he was a pipe maker. That was helpful for a person starting to play, as any piper will bemoan to you the problems you can have with reeds.

    After that, got to know the County Clare piper, Willie Clancy, who was a very generous person. The pipes that I now play, used to belong to Willie, and they were made by Leo Rowsome in 1936. It's fitting since my mother originally came from County Clare, from same town as Willie Clancy. 8_________________________________________________ Yes, during the '30s-'50s the instrument almost died out, but people like Leo Rowsome, Willie Clancy and Seamus Ennis kept it going. In 1968, the uilleann pipers formed their own organization, which was important. After that the instrument was being heard in a more commercial field, and it was made more accessible to people. 9_________________________________________________ Traditionally the pipes and the fiddle are the most popular kind of duet. Growing up I played in solo uilleann pipe competitions, but there were always fiddle and pipe duet competitions. 10_________________________________________________ I'm amazed that so many people over the years have come up and said that it was through my piping with Planxty that they found traditional music. When we came together as a band, we didn't have any ideas about the kind of impact we were going to make. It all happened through a solo album that Christy Moore made. Myself, Andy and Donald were invited to play on it, and it worked really well. At the time we decided to give it two or three months to see what happened, but then it really took off.

    http://www.thistleradio.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=71:Liam

  • CENTRE DIDIOMES DE LA UNIVERSITAT DE VALNCIA 7

    Questions Question A is an example.

    POSITION IN THE TEXT

    A The uilleann pipes are probably the most complex of all the pipes because of the regulators.

    0

    B People often write to us at The Thistle & Shamrock asking how to identify between different types of tunes.

    C You were fortunate to grow up being able to hear the uilleann pipes played by the best, because at that time, the instrument really had faded from popularity.

    D People enjoy hearing the instrument played, but do you think they also need to see it being played to fully understand what the artist is doing?

    E

    We've talked about the pipes and about the music, now let's talk about the piper, Liam O'Flynn. Can you give us a quick tour of your musical life, from your tutelage under Leo Rowsome to performing with musicians of your own generation?

    F Many people associate your career with Planxty. Do people still associate you with that despite having done so much else?

    G Can you look back on your career to periods when you thought you'd mastered it, and then hit a new level seven years later?

    H

    People also quickly started to recognize the versatility of the uilleann pipes. Unlike the Scottish Highland pipes which are very dominating, the uilleann pipes are very sociable and can be played with a chamber or symphony orchestra, or with a small group of acoustic instruments.

    I It's often forgotten that much of the music is music for people to dance to. Some of it only makes sense when you see the dance to go with it.

    J We've talked about the instrument so now let's talk about the music. The pipes have their own repertoire, even though there are tunes shared between instruments.

    K

    When I hear an Irish singer and the ornamentation around the notes, I wonder if the singer is trying to evoke the sound of the pipes, or if the pipes are trying to echo the sound of the human voice. Is it that these things have just evolved together in the music of Ireland?

    J It sounds like you were destined to do what youre doing. Do you think you ould have avoided it?

  • CENTRE DIDIOMES DE LA UNIVERSITAT DE VALNCIA 8