Dressability Posters (NXPowerLite)

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  • Poster/Presentation set for use during talks on Kingshill, memory loss and dementia.

    This is the full set of materials, which you will find on the Library computer at C:\My Documents\Publicity & Promotion\Talks& Presentations\presentation master.ppt.

    If overheads/slides are needed for specific talks, it may be useful save as and edit the selection down to meet the specific need.

    Most of the set has also been printed off and laminated to form a set of display materials (to be found on the display boards and in the Display folder)

  • Poster/Presentation set for use during talks on Kingshill, memory loss and dementia.

    This is the full set of materials, which you will find on the Library computer at C:\My Documents\Publicity & Promotion\Talks& Presentations\presentation master.ppt.

    If overheads/slides are needed for specific talks, it may be useful save as and edit the selection down to meet the specific need.

    Most of the set has also been printed off and laminated to form a set of display materials (to be found on the display boards and in the Display folder)

  • Our VisionTo provide a service for anyone who is having difficultieswith dressing themselves or has special clothing needs,their families and carers living inSwindon, North and West Wiltshire.

  • Our WorkWe offer clothing advice and information garment alterations and adaptations dressmaking and design

  • It is likely to be of particular relevance to older people and to children and adults with disabilities.Providing an accessible, specialist alteration, dressmaking and design service we enable continued independence, social inclusion and dignity. Who is the service for?

    Memory problems are not an automatic part of ageing. However, age does bring an increasing likelihood of experiencing a degree of memory loss. In 40% of people over the age of 65, memory will function less well than would be expected for their age. However, for the vast majority of these, this will not have any major impact on their everyday life.To date, research indicates that, as we get older: Our speed of mental processing decreases - this means that it may take longer for us to acquire new information and to recall existing knowledge. Given time, though, we will be able to do so as well or better than someone younger. Short term memory processing tasks, such as mental arithmetic or word finding may become harder. It is possible that an inbuilt ability to ignore irrelevant information may decrease, leading to poorer concentration and increased difficulty in acquiring new information. Our capacity to think flexibly may decline. We may have a decreasing ability to remember context. We may need to use 'props' such as lists or diaries to remind us of tasks to be done in the future.On the other hand, an older person has the advantage of a larger store of knowledge and a wider vocabulary.

    According to Dr Gary Small, director of the Centre for Ageing at the University of California, genetics can predict only one third of brain ageing. The other two thirds are accounted for by environment and lifestyle choices. Therefore there are things we can to do to help keep our brains healthy. (See How can I help my memory?)You can read Dr Gary Small's article What we need to know about age related memory loss on the British Medical Journal web site and details of his book The Memory Bible on our books page.

  • Key AchievementsIn 2000/2001, we were able to provide advice to, alter or make clothes for 138 individuals. By 2002/2003 this had increased to 220.With a gradual raising of our profile, 48 organisations contacted us in 2002/2003 for information more than double the number for 2000/2001.

    Normal occasionally forgetting a deadline or colleagues name.Abnormal frequent forgetfulness or unexplainable confusionN- We all get distracted! E.g. forgetting to serve the vegetablesA - Someone with AD might forget they had ever prepared the meal.N Everyone struggles for the right word sometimesA Someone with AD may forget simple words or substitute words inappropriately, making sentences difficult to understand.N Its normal to forget what day it is or what you went to the store for.A With AD, people may get lost in their own street, not knowing how they got there or how to get home.N We all may fail to bring a sweater on a chilly night.A A person with AD might wear a dressing gown to go out.N Many people have difficulty balancing their chequebooks.A Someone with AD may not recognise numbers and basic calculations may be impossibleN Everyone misplaces keys, wallets, etc.A A person with AD may put the iron in the freezer or their watch in the sugar bowl and then have no idea how they got there.N Everyone experiences a range of emotions.A People with AD tend to exhibit more rapid mood swings for no apparent reason.N Personality can change somewhat with age. A A person with AD can change dramatically, perhaps becoming angry, suspicious or fearful.N It is normal to tire of housework, business or social obligations at times.A The person with AD may remain uninterested or uninvolved in many or all of their normal pursuits

  • Social ExclusionClothing can denote StatusGenderOccupationIndividuality

    Society judges people by the way they look. Those with an unconventional appearance are often patronised, undervalued or ignored.

    DEMENTIA umbrella term used to describe the loss of cognitive or intellectual function. Dementia is a condition characterised by a progressive decline of mental abilities, accompanied by changes in personality and behaviour. There is commonly a loss of memory ad skills that are needed to carry out everyday activities.Alzheimers disease (AD) accounts for more than half of all cases.Vascular disease causes 20%. Arteries supplying blood to the brain become blocked and brain tissue is damaged either by lack of oxygen or from strokes causing bleeding in the brain.Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) may be responsible for about 20% of dementia cases. It is similar to AD, but symptoms are subtly different. Half or more of those with DLB also develop symptoms of Parkinsons.Frontal lobe dementia/Picks disease similar to Alzheimers, involving progressive decline in mental powers. Because damage is more localised to the front of the brain, initial symptoms affect personality & behaviour more and memory less than AD.Parkinsons disease is associated with dementia in 15 20% of cases. So not everyone with Parkinsons will have dementia, but you may have a diagnosis of dementia in Parkinsons.Huntingtons disease is associated with mental deteriorationBrain tumour can cause dementia symptoms, sometimes curable by removal of the tumour.HIV & CJD cause a tiny proportion of dementia cases.Severe depression can sometimes be mistaken for dementia. Symptoms will diminish if the depression is treated.

  • I've a right to dress up like anybody else. My self-image has improved dramatically because of the clothes Dressability has adapted for me. It's about dignity. I feel on equal terms with others around me.(Dressability Client)

  • Glamorous Granny Cynthia asked us to adapt some old favourites from her collection of evening-wear. She has always had a passion for dancing and loves to look stylish and feminine.

  • Talks for community groupsWe are happy to provide speakers for community groups wishing to know more about what we can offer.

    Call us on 01793 485374 to find out more or book a speaker.

    We are currently looking for 200 healthy volunteers.

  • What does it cost?

    As we are a voluntary sector organisation, we make only a small charge.For example, taking up a hem might cost from 3.50 depending on the garment. Free Home Visits!Dressability will visit you in your own home. If we alter or make something for you, we will collect and deliver at no extra cost.

    Normal occasionally forgetting a deadline or colleagues name.Abnormal frequent forgetfulness or unexplainable confusionN- We all get distracted! E.g. forgetting to serve the vegetablesA - Someone with AD might forget they had ever prepared the meal.N Everyone struggles for the right word sometimesA Someone with AD may forget simple words or substitute words inappropriately, making sentences difficult to understand.N Its normal to forget what day it is or what you went to the store for.A With AD, people may get lost in their own street, not knowing how they got there or how to get home.N We all may fail to bring a sweater on a chilly night.A A person with AD might wear a dressing gown to go out.N Many people have difficulty balancing their chequebooks.A Someone with AD may not recognise numbers and basic calculations may be impossibleN Everyone misplaces keys, wallets, etc.A A person with AD may put the iron in the freezer or their watch in the sugar bowl and then have no idea how they got there.N Everyone experiences a range of emotions.A People with AD tend to exhibit more rapid mood swings for no apparent reason.N Personality can change somewhat with age. A A person with AD can change dramatically, perhaps becoming angry, suspicious or fearful.N It is normal to tire of housework, business or social obligations at times.A The person with AD may remain uninterested or uninvolved in many or all of their normal pursuits

  • Help for Carers

    Dressability offers a practical service that can make a real difference to the stress carers often experience in coping with difficulties in dressing or undressing the person they care for.

  • Are the buttons on your favourite jacket becoming a problem? Dressability can adapt your garment to fasten invisibly with Velcro, so that you look as smart as ever. Do you have a long dress that you love but have